Japanese knotweed hotspots on the peninsula revealed by environmental map

  Posted: 06.05.21 at 08:35 by Derek Davis

us on Facebook




First it was the beach invaders, now Harsktead is at the epicentre of another seriously unwanted visitor.

The peninsula village has been identified on an environmental heat map as bringing unwitting hosts to an invasion of Japanese Knotweed.

At least 10 cases of the invasive plants have been reported in Harkstead and a four kilometre radius, similar numbers have been identified in Holbrook and Chelmondiston, according to Environet UK's Knotweed heat map here...

The knotweed often grows into dense thickets and overwhelms native flora, contributing to river bank erosion and increasing the likelihood of flooding.

It can also cause significant delays and cost to development as well as structural damage (it can grow through asphalt and some other surfaces).

It was introduced in the early 19th century as an ornamental plant but is now common and wide-
spread across the UK after being spread rapidly in the wild by natural means and as a result of spread by humans.
Government advice to contain and get rid of the knotweed can be found on its website here...


Nub News reported last August how an influx of visitors had upset Harkstead locals. Full story here.
Send us your Japanese knotweed pictures and stories here: [email protected]


Like this article? Sign up to our weekly newsletter...

Next Shotley news item...

Thursday's Peninsula Breakfast Briefing

Thursday's Teaser Which British athlete became the first to run a sub-four minute mile, recording 3:59:4 at Iffley Road Track, Oxford,...
Read more...

Share: